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Aha! Hack: Hanging Magnet as DIY, Deconstructed Kitchen Catch-All

Jochen Holz Kitchen Worksurface

To be filed under Genius Kitchen Hacks to Borrow from an Artist: the DIY twists on tradition in German-born glassmaker Jochen Holz‘s studio kitchen in Stratford, East London. (Contributor Nell Card took a full tour a few weeks back on Remodelista; see Kitchen of the Week: A Glassmaker’s Imaginative Studio Kitchen in London, DIY Ikea Hacks Included).

Among Holz’s revelatory ideas? A painted sheet of glass as ad-hoc backsplash, reclaimed Marmoleum scraps pieced together into a countertop, and Ikea cabinet boxes transformed with pink-tinted plywood fronts and the artist’s own handmade glass door handles. Plus, shelves and shelves of Holz’s own molten, multi-colored glassware.

But our favorite detail is small, simple, and easy to implement with a trip to the hardware store and a few minutes’ time: a hanging riff on a magnetic knife rack. Take a look.

Photography by Kim Lightbody.

Jochen Holz Studio Kitchen Counter, Photo by Kim Lightbody
Above: A round industrial magnet suspended from a cord acts as a simple and sculptural catch-all for metal kitchen implements of all kinds: knives, but also scissors and tiny graters.
Jochen Holz Kitchen Worksurface
Above: The arrangement keeps utensils off the counter but at the ready.

Steal This Look

Ring Magnet from Zoro.com
Above: Be sure your magnet has enough strength to hold utensils by checking the weight limit in the description. This Ring Magnet from online emporium Zoro.com can hold 9.8 pounds, perfect a few knives and other tools; $4.33 each.

No time to buy online? Search your local hardware store; they may have something similar.

Everbilt Black Twisted Nylon Rope from The Home Depot
Above: Similarly, choose a cord sturdy enough to hold the magnet (and its attachments)—you wouldn’t want this crashing down. One option is the marine-grade Everbilt Black Twisted Nylon Rope, which holds knots tightly and is resistant to water and mildew (crucial for the kitchen). It’s 55 cents per foot from The Home Depot.

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